What Is Napoleon`s Reaction to the Animals Agreement to Build the Windmill

Napoleon’s Reaction to the Animals Agreement to Build the Windmill

In George Orwell’s classic allegorical novel Animal Farm, the animals’ decision to build a windmill creates a stir among the animal residents. Despite strong opposition from some of the animals, the majority vote agrees to build the windmill. But what does Napoleon, the cunning and corrupt pig leader, think of this decision?

Napoleon’s reaction to the animals’ agreement to build the windmill is complicated, as his real motives are shrouded in secrecy. On the surface, Napoleon appears to be in support of the windmill project. He even encourages the animals to work harder and longer hours to ensure the success of the project. However, it is clear that his true feelings lie elsewhere.

Napoleon’s primary motivation for supporting the windmill project is to establish his power and control over the other animals. By endorsing the windmill project, Napoleon gains the trust and support of the other animals, who start to view him as a capable and visionary leader. This enhances his stature as the leader of the farm and makes it easier for him to manipulate the other animals in the future.

Furthermore, by supporting the windmill project, Napoleon is able to suppress any dissent that might arise among the animals. By presenting himself as a strong advocate of the project, he creates a sense of unity and purpose among the animals, which dissuades any opposition to his leadership.

However, beneath the surface, Napoleon’s true intentions are revealed. As the windmill project progresses, Napoleon becomes more and more obsessed with power and control. He starts to resort to increasingly brutal and oppressive tactics to maintain his control over the other animals.

In the end, Napoleon’s true intentions are exposed, and the windmill project becomes a symbol of his corrupt and abusive leadership. The windmill, which was initially intended to be a symbol of progress and modernization, becomes a symbol of oppression and tyranny under Napoleon’s rule.

In conclusion, Napoleon’s reaction to the animals’ agreement to build the windmill is complicated, as his real motives are shrouded in secrecy. While he appears to be in support of the project, his true intentions are to establish his power and control over the other animals. In the end, the windmill becomes a symbol of his corrupt leadership, which ultimately leads to the downfall of Animal Farm.